South Carolina Home Care Services


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South Carolina Home Care Services

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Contact South Carolina Home Care Services

For the convenience of the public, the ScCPC has listed the providers above to show what services may be available in South Carolina. We cannot verify the business practice nor the background of these providers. As a result, we do not provide their contact information. If you wish to contact a member of our council regarding any of the services listed above, please fill out the form below and a council member will contact you. Please be aware that your information may be shared with other members of the council who might be able to help you as well. Read Our Disclaimer.

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About Traditional Home Health Agencies

    Although most home care is provided by family, friends or volunteers, there is a growing trend to hire paid individuals or professionals to provide this care in the home. The hiring of care is prompted by a growing trend for traditional caregivers to be employed full-time and unable to offer much help or for family to live hundreds of miles away from the loved one and find it difficult to offer hands-on long-distance care.

    In the year 2000, about 12,800 home health agencies served approximately 8,600,000 clients across the United States . In that year Medicare paid an estimated 85% to 90% of the total cost of home health agency services amounting to $ 8,700,000,000. Although current figures are not yet available, the number of home health agencies has been going up year after year as well as the number of clients being served.

    Although home health agencies are privately owned, Medicare is the principle payer for their services. Home health services through Medicare are available under parts A and B. In order to qualify for Medicare homecare a person must have a skilled need, must be homebound and there must be a plan of care ordered by a Physician.

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About Personal Care or Non-medical Home Health Care

    hese providers represent a rapidly growing trend to allow people needing help with long term care to remain in their home or in the community instead of going to a care facility.

    A search of your local Yellow Pages under "home health agencies (or services)" will reveal that a large number of the advertised providers are personal care or non-medical home health companies. This causes some confusion since the yellow pages choose the same classification to list non-medical and traditional home health agencies together.

    Personal care agencies are different from traditional home health agencies in that they do not provide medical services or skilled services and they are not paid by Medicare.

    In addition, many states do not require personal care agencies to license with the state health department. In some states a person desiring to start a business like this need only advertise, get a business license and start hiring employees. On the other hand, some states require these companies to meet the same stringent rules under which traditional home health agencies operate. This might include hiring trained employees, the use of care plans, periodic inspections by the state health department and bonding.

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